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Latest News:

26.08.16

ERIH Annual Conference 2016 - Register now

26 to 29 October 2016 in Porto / Portugal

Topic: Industrial Heritage - How to tell the...


13.07.16

Lion Salt Works needs you

ERIH Anchor Point Lion Salt Works needs your votes to become one of UK´s favourite Heritage...


14.06.16

ERIH UK Chapter meeting in Essex

ERIH UK held their quarterly chapter meeting at Great Dunmow Maltings in Essex


Welcome

to the European Route of Industrial Heritage, the tourism information network of industrial heritage in Europe. 

Currently we present 1,315 sites in 45 European countries. Among these sites there are around 90 Anchor Points which build the virtual ERIH main route. On nineteen Regional Routes you can discover the industrial history of these landscapes in detail. All sites relate to thirteen European Theme Routes which show the diversity of European industrial history and their common roots.

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Anchor Point of the Day
National Coal Mining Museum for England | Wakefield

You had better dress up warm here. For you’ll be going 140 metres underground. And below...

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Anchor Points

Anchor points illustrate the complete range of European industrial history.
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Regional Routes

The Regional Routes link landscapes and sites which have left their mark on European industrial history.
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European Theme Routes

Theme Routes take up specific questions relating to European industrial history.
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Biographies

History is always made by people. We present a selection of personalities who influenced the European industrial history.
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Do you know...

that an abbot in Belgium built a blast furnace?

In 1771 Dom Nicolas Spirlet, the last abbot of the St Hubert Benedictine monastery, had the St Michael blast furnace built in the wooded area of Fourneau Saint-Michel. It was in operation until 1942. 10 years later the historic industrial site was given the status of a monument. The blast furnace is one of the best maintained furnaces of its type in Europe, and still contains a shaft, a foundry and charcoal sheds. Since 1977 the "Musée du fer" (Museum of Iron) has one of the units in the adjacent "Musee de la vie rural en Wallonie", an open-air museum containing fifty typical regional buildings.

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This website was last modified on 3rd August 2016.